What is the best casket to buy online? (2021)

We compared caskets and coffins available through popular online retailers like Walmart, Amazon, Costco and Sam’s Club to find the best casket option. Our researchers also considered options available through smaller retailers, like TrustedCaskets.com and BestPriceCaskets.com. This guide breaks down buying options across a variety of considerations – whether you are looking for something affordable, luxurious, durable or anything in between.

If you have the time and energy, we highly recommend learning about how to choose the best casket for your needs – we include a guide at the bottom of this post. Learning about what goes into this shopping decision will allow you to become a better-informed consumer – whether you choose to ultimately make this purchase online or in-person.

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Browse top-rated caskets

Best Casket Overall: Orion Steel Casket with White Interior

  • All Titan Casket funeral caskets ship FREE directly to the funeral home of your choice
  • Full rubber gasketed casket, built from high quality 20 gauge steel
  • Beautifully made casket for men or women with White Crepe interior and adjustable bed (both head and foot)
  • Classic squared-corner design with reinforced stationary handles
  • Made in the USA, hand-crafted design with sculpted, detailed hardware; Fits in standard burial vault

Best Hardwood Casket: Mahogany Solid Wood Velvet Interior

  • High-quality hardwood finish
  • 1-2 Day Shipping Available to 80% of the USA. Contact seller for more information.
  • Must Be Shipped to Commercial Address/Funeral Home.

Best Metal Casket: Prime Rose Antique White Finish with Pink Interior

  • Beautifully crafted, from 18 gauge steel.
  • Medium glossy, white shaded copper finish, the inside is fully lined and features a pink velvet interior with intricately embroidered roses sewn into the head panel. 
  • The solid swing bars are made of gold hardware.
  • Features rounded corners and golden jewel tone accents with rose details

Best Eco-Friendly Casket: Bamboo Casket from Passages

  • Durable, convenient handles for carrying and an interior lined with natural unbleached cotton with a matching pillow and privacy shield. These simple and attractive caskets are suitable for viewing and services prior to burial or cremation.
  • Available in two sizes which nest comfortably, one inside the other, for secure and more efficient shipping.
  • When buried directly in the earth (without a grave liner or vault) this casket will break down naturally over time. Bamboo caskets are also suitable as a cremation container.

Best Caskets by Under $900: Stanford White casket White finish with White Interior

  • Expertly crafted from the highest quality products available.
  • Featuring 20 Gauge Steel, this casket is sturdy and durable.
  • Finished in a glossy white, and the interior is fully lined with white crepe bedding.
  • Included is a matching white pillow and throw.
  • Crafted with squared corners, equipped with the locking mechanism.
  • The stationary handle hardware is made up of premium aluminum with polished hardware.

How to choose the best casket?

You’ll want to start with your budget. Price will be the number one factor that will decide your choices.

If you don’t want to spend a lot of money on a casket, you should go with a stainless steel one – these will generally be the least expensive. You might also be able to find an affordable choice if you go with a lower-quality wood, like pine. The downside of choosing these materials is that they are not as durable. In the case of stainless steel, it will rust over time and break down. Cheaper wood options, on the other hand, will crack and break.

Carbon steel is another affordable option. Here, you will need to decide on the gauge you want – the most common options are 16, 18 and 20. The lower the number the heavier and thicker the steel – and as a result, the more expensive the casket.

If you’re comfortable spending north of $1,500 on a casket, you will want to start looking at better quality steel or hardwood.

Caskets made of mahogany, walnut, cherry, mapel, oak or ash will be the most expensive. These are also often a popular option that most people go with. Wood is elegant and dignified. Finer quality finishes will also come with nice patterns and designs that can really help celebrate or honor the deceased. The more you customize these finishes, the more expensive the casket.

Metal caskets come in more colors and finishes. Bronze and copper are among the most expensive, and are resistant to rust. Over time, they will oxidize and lose their color (think of New York’s Statue of Liberty).

A standard casket is generally 84 inches long, 28 inches wide, and 23 inches tall. If you require a larger casket, it will cost extra.

Frequently Asked Questions

We collected a few questions that frequently pop up whenever people shop for caskets. 

What is the best type of casket?
There is no best type of casket – as the answer depends entirely on what you are looking for. Most people assume higher quality caskets (hardwood, bronze or copper) are “best”. However, these are also extremely expensive, and may not be worth the money in the eyes of many.

What is the difference between a coffin and a casket?
Coffins are tapered at the head and foot and are wide at the shoulders. Caskets are rectangular in shape and are usually constructed of better quality timbers and feature higher standards of workmanship.

What is the difference between a 18 and 20 gauge casket?
An 18 gauge casket is considered “medium thickness” and is heavier and thicker than a 20 gauge casket. 18 gauge caskets are more expensive than 20 gauge ones.

Wood vs Metal Caskets: What is Better?
As with the question of “what is the best casket type”, the answer here is that it depends. There are certain metal caskets most folks would consider worse than metal caskets, and vice versa. The answer here really depends on the particulars of the casket in question. For example, many folks would consider a mahogany casket to be better than a stainless steel one. However, a bronze coffin would be “better” than most pine ones.